#BeFearless

Beyond the Boundaries is Just a Start

WE FUEL A RELENTLESS ENTREPRENEURIAL MINDSET. We are addressing the nation’s biggest challenges and thinking ahead to those we’ve yet to encounter. Through science, invention and innovation, we are evolving our institution and improving the outlook of the future.

Environment
automated buoy
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A Buoy of the Future

The Texas Automated Buoy System is the only buoy system of its kind in the US

This network of smart buoys, moored across the Gulf of Mexico, provides us with real-time ocean observations and empowers us to revolutionize oil spill prevention and response.

Killer Compounds

Researchers at Texas A&M have discovered a molecular compound that dissolves the HIV virus on contact. This compound could lead to the development of a powerful topical preventative treatment for the virus that causes AIDS.

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Sponge Solution

Our researchers are looking to the sea for a cutting-edge alternative to chemotherapy. They are isolating natural products from marine sponges that can serve as anti-cancer agents and inorganic delivery materials for anti-cancer drugs targeted directly at tumor cells.

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Nuclear Potential

We have one of the largest nuclear engineering programs in the United States. In the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M, we are pursuing experimental treatments in cancer and other medical conditions, preparing and educating future nuclear scientists, and developing capacities of social science and public policy focused on the human impacts, safety and security of nuclear use.

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3 NOBEL PRIZE WINNERS

3 WOLF PRIZE WINNERS

2015 STEM ENROLLMENT: 28,141 STUDENTS

$820 MILLION IN RESEARCH EXPENDITURES

FIRST LINE OF DEFENSE

The best way to prevent a pandemic in the U.S. is to stop it before it reaches our shores. At Texas A&M we are taking action to prevent future global outbreaks through our Global Pandemic Policy Program. The initiative, launched by the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs, unites top minds in the fields of public health, medicine, homeland security, veterinary medicine, engineering, agriculture, economics, psychology, government and international diplomacy, all to prepare for and enhance our response to future threats to the world.

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Search and Rescue
Crasar
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Robotic Rescue

THE CENTER FOR ROBOT-ASSISTED SEARCH AND RESCUE (CRASAR) AT TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY HAS THE LARGEST NUMBER OF DEPLOYMENTS OF RESCUE ROBOTS OF ANY TYPE: LAND, SEA OR AIR.

This crisis response and research organization utilizes new technology development in robotics and unmanned systems for humanitarian purposes worldwide.

CRASAR Has Seen Action:

  • 2001: World Trade Center 9/11
  • 2004: Hurricane Charley
  • 2005: La Conchita Mudslides
  • 2005: Hurricane Katrina response and restoration operations
  • 2005: Hurricane Wilma
  • 2007: Midas Gold Mine Collapse, Nevada
  • 2007: Crandall Canyon Coal Mine Collapse, Utah
  • 2007: Berkman Plaza II Collapse, Jacksonville FL, response
  • 2008: Berkman Plaza II Collapse, structural forensics
  • 2008: Post-Hurricane Ike
  • 2009: State Archives Collapse, Cologne, Germany
  • 2009: Post-L’Aquila Earthquake, Italy reconstruction operations
  • 2011: Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident
  • 2011: Great East Japan Tsunami, restoration operations
  • 2011: Great East Japan Tsunami, reconstruction operations
  • 2014: SR 530 Washington State Mudslides
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Finding Cures

Dr. James Sacchetini and his research team are worldwide leaders in structural biology advancements. Sacchettini is highly acclaimed for his research efforts geared toward malaria, tuberculosis and cancer. His role in the development of a novel compound that sensitizes drug-resistant cancer cells in standard chemotherapeutics could lead to new treatments for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma as well as ovarian, breast, prostate and pancreatic cancers.

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Going Mobile

A zoonotic disease is one that can be transmitted between animals and people. Approximately 75% of the pathogens affecting animals are of this high-consequence nature. Controlling the spread of these serious diseases depends on our ability to detect an outbreak early. That’s why we created a mobile surveillance tool that records and assembles animal-health data from livestock producers, veterinarians, diagnostic laboratories, markets and wildlife. This technology could revolutionize animal disease detection and response—in a matter of minutes.

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Putting an End to the Loss

We are addressing food loss and waste through education, training, market development and targeted investments that are focused on problems at the farm, processing and market levels.

Global food losses account for:

  • 30% of cereals
  • 20% of meat
  • 20% of dairy
  • 20% of oilseeds
  • 35% of fish and seafood
  • 45% of root crops
  • 45% of fruits and vegetables

Source: UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)

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